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Shanghai Daily,上海日报

Global Lens on China

外媒看中国


Ten must-read books that explain modern China

Ten must-read books that explain modern China

十本揭秘当代中国的必读之书

China is a place of contradictions and nuances. Here’s but one: China is the world’s second-largest economy, as we often hear, but the average Chinese worker earns about as much during the year as someone from the Dominican Republic.


The country is hard enough to understand without book publishers trying to exploit our fear and excitement about the Middle Kingdom with bombastic titles like China’s Crash Is Coming, Why China Will Rule The Next Century, and Your Baby Is Really Chinese. (OK, that last one isn’t out — yet.)


Sometimes a masterpiece will reach the bestseller list; former New Yorker correspondent Peter Hessler’s three books about his experiences over 11 years living in China are cases in point. But oftentimes, readers ready to embrace China’s complexities are left to pick through a selection of titles that don’t do justice to a country that just 50 years ago saw millions of its citizens die of hunger—and today is widely recognized as an inevitable superpower.

Full Story

Fortune | April 4, 2015, Saturday


A New Cancer Drug, Made in China

A New Cancer Drug, Made in China

中国制造的新型抗癌药

Xian-Ping Lu left his job as director of research at drug maker Galderma R&D in Princeton, N.J., to co-found a biotech company to develop new medicines in his native China.


It took more than 14 years but the bet could be paying off. In February, Shenzhen Chipscreen Biosciences’ first therapy, a medication for a rare type of lymph-node cancer, hit the market in China.


The willingness of veterans like Dr. Lu and others to leave multinational drug companies for Chinese startups reflects a growing optimism in the industry here. The goal, encouraged by the government, is to move the Chinese drug industry beyond generic medicines and drugs based on ones developed in the West.

Full Story

The Wall Street Journal | April 2, 2015, Thursday


China to step up urbanization along Yangtze River

China to step up urbanization along Yangtze River

中国进一步推进长江流域的城市化

China's government released on Sunday a framework to develop sprawling urban areas along the Yangtze River as it moves forward with a decade-long ambition to turn the Chinese heartland into a major economic belt.


Although no specific investment details were released, the State Council, China's cabinet, said on its website it would designate 317,000 square kilometers along the river to become urban areas, hosting transportation and energy projects.


The designated urban development area will span the three provinces of Hubei, Hunan and Jiangxi near and around the metropolitan areas of Changsha and Wuhan.


China's top leadership has outlined plans to turn the Yangtze, which runs from China's western highlands and empties into the East China Sea near Shanghai, into an economic axis that would catch up with China's highly developed coastal regions.

Full Story

Reuters | April 5, 2015, Sunday


Wuhan’s drive to become China’s car city

Wuhan’s drive to become China’s car city

武汉梦想成为中国的汽车之城

When Zhu Chun Quio first started out as a taxi driver in Wuhan more than 30 years ago, he remembers that there were 32,570 cars on the road, all Toyota Crowns. These days almost 2m cars clutter up the sprawling city’s thoroughfares. “At 9am we’re already bumper-to-bumper,” says Zhu, at the wheel of his C-Elysee, one of the models manufactured locally by Dongfeng Peugeot Citroen.


Wuhan, population 10 million, is a transport hub, and dreams of becoming the car city of the People’s Republic. The automobile industry represents 20% of the city’s economy, with 200,000 direct jobs and more than a million indirectly.


And Wuhan’s car industry is growing fast. General Motors and its Chinese partner, the Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation, have launched a new plant capable of producing 240,000 vehicles annually. At the end of this year Renault will be rolling out an assembly unit. With the plants operated by the Dongfeng-PSA Peugeot Citroën joint venture and Honda, among others, the provincial capital will soon have about 10 car factories, producing more than 2m vehicles a year, in an area smaller than the Paris basin. In 2014 Wuhan was the world’s seventh-largest centre of automobile production, with 1.13m vehicles assembled, although Chongqing, which assembled 2.3m vehicles last year, tops the global rankings.

Full Story

Guardian | April 6, 2015, Monday


The Secret to China’s Most Valuable Startup

The Secret to China’s Most Valuable Startup

中国最有价值的创新企业之谜

Zhao Ruiping assembles mechanical valves at a factory in this southern Chinese city. But he spent a recent Saturday evening at one of the city’s flashiest nightclubs—as a VIP guest of Xiaomi Corp. As the WSJ’s Eva Dou reports:
“I’ve never been to a club before,” said Mr. Zhao, 27 years old, who arrived in his brown work jacket. “I’m just an average worker. I can’t afford to go to places like this.”


The party, for about 300 fans, was an example of why Xiaomi has risen so quickly to the top of China’s smartphone market. It has spun a dream of social advancement for China’s vast numbers of young people, a dream of luxuries from the developed world now within reach.


Xiaomi sells smartphones that in many aspects are similar to phones from Apple Inc. andSamsung Electronics Co., but for less than half the price. The company became the world’s fifth-largest smartphone maker last year and the world’s most valuable startup by a recent Wall Street Journal tally, with a valuation of $46 billion.

Full Story

The Wall Street Journal | April 7, 2015, Tuesday


China issues new guidelines to reduce logging

China issues new guidelines to reduce logging

中国发布新指导规范减少树木砍伐

China will reduce logging on planted forests and eventually end logging on natural forests, under a plan published this week by the State Council, China’s cabinet.


Under the guidelines, China will reduce commercial harvesting of planted forests by 20 percent and eliminate logging on state-owned natural forests by 2020.


Amid the many environmental concerns facing China, the country’s forest cover has seen notable progress over the past several decades. China began aggressive efforts to expand its depleted forests in the 1980s, and that campaign took on a new intensity after 1998, when flooding of the Yangtze River was attributed to rampant logging. As a result “more of the country is forested than at any time since the early Qing” dynasty, the University of Washington scholars Alicia S.T. Robbins and Stevan Harrell wrote last year. The Qing dynasty spanned from 1644 to 1911.

Full Story

The New York Times | March 19, 2015, Thursday


China's Huawei leads international patent filings: WIPO

China's Huawei leads international patent filings: WIPO

中国华为领跑国际专利认证

Chinese telecom giant Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] became the world's No. 1 applicant for international patents in 2014, a United Nations agency said Thursday, underscoring the innovative strides made by Chinese technology companies.


Huawei was followed by San Diego-based chipmaker Qualcomm Inc while Huawei's crosstown rival ZTE Corp, which was the world's leading applicant in 2012, took third place in its number of filings, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).


WIPO's report, which is sometimes viewed as a rough barometer of a country's technological progress, noted that China was the only country to see double-digit growth in its filings, although U.S. companies led by far. High-tech and automotive powerhouse Japan, home to last year's leading applicant Panasonic Corp, saw its total filings slide.

Full Story

Reuters | March 19, 2015, Thursday


Wired women: the $3tn women powering China's tech boom

Wired women: the $3tn women powering China's tech boom

联网女性:中国女性网购年消费3万亿美元助力中国科技发展

“Women hold up half the sky,” Chairman Mao once said. In the Chinese digital economy the same is true, with a newly empowered middle class of wealthy, well educated women who live and breathe social media and online shopping, spending $3tn annually in China alone. The average Chinese ‘wired woman’, according to research presented by Evelina Lye, SapientNitro’s head of marketing for Asia Pacific told SXSW on Sunday, typically own as many as five devices each. This group of around 115 million women are aged 25-35, half if them are mothers, 75% are college graduates and 87% are in employment. The Chinese tech ecosystem looks very different to the rest of the world, with a domestic market that has become very powerful in the past three years; WeChat is ubiquitous, used for everything from taxi cab fares to messaging friends, but for every household name in western technology there are ten viable Chinese services.

Full Story

The Guardian | March 16, 2015, Monday


China’s ‘comfort women’

China’s ‘comfort women’

中国慰安妇

The sound of clay pots smashing against a stone floor shattered the cold spring morning. Zhang Xiantu woke. Japanese soldiers were in her home, breaking bowls as they searched for food. Zhang, 16 and just married, tried to run. But she couldn’t run fast enough: as the daughter of a landowner, she’d had her tiny feet bound and broken when she was a child. Sitting in her village home in Yu County, Shanxi province, the newlywed so rudely awoken in 1942 is now a birdlike widow, grey hair pulled back from her lined face, her breath raspy from lung disease. “When I dream of that time, I always dream of being seized,” she says. “I was so terrified.” There was no escape. “The soldiers came and they found us . . . The streets were full of people running in every direction.” Her breathing slows, and becomes harsher. “Aiyya . . . I’ve forgotten everything else.” Zhang spent the next 20 days a prisoner. Locked in a neighbour’s house, she was prostituted as a “comfort woman” for the Japanese soldiers battling to control northern China. “I almost died of fear,” she says.

Full Story

Financial Times | March 20, 2015, Friday


Netflix to show Chinese drama ‘Empresses In The Palace'; Is it next step in entry into China?

Netflix to show Chinese drama ‘Empresses In The Palace'; Is it next step in entry into China?

NETFLIX首播《甄嬛传》

Netflix has acquired popular Chinese drama Empresses In The Palace for its U.S. service, cutting down the original series’ 76 45-minute episodes into six 90-minute episodes. The show, which first aired in China as well as several other Asian countries in 2011, follows the intrigues among the emperor’s concubines in the imperial palace of the Qing Dynasty. Intriguingly, however, the move’s real significance could be in marking a foundation for a major new relationship for the streaming giant with LeTV, one of China’s leading online video platforms with more than 100,000 TV episodes and 5,000 movies. Deadline understands that execs from Netflix and LeTV met this week to begin discussing ways in which the two companies can collaborate moving forward. One particular area of interest will be with the international rollout of LeTV Cloud. LeTV has big ambitions for its cloud platform: In January this year it said it had closed a deal with Microsoft to work closely together to build a global platform based on Microsoft’s cloud platform, integrating LeTV’s video cloud computing service with Microsoft’s media service Windows Azure.

Full Story

Deadline.com | March 20, 2015, Friday




As China continues to grab increasing media attention worldwide, our partner runs a regular column to reveal what overseas media are saying about China and how they view the country's fast economic, social and cultural development.

中国崛起聚焦了世界的目光。上至高层动态,下至社会民生,中国的一举一动无不成为外媒烹调的材料。我们的合作伙伴观察者网为您带来中文深度阅读。

Check it out at http://www.guancha.cn/WaiMeiKanZhongGuo/


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