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Shanghai Daily,上海日报

Global Lens on China

外媒看中国


Little Apple: the hit song all of China is singing to a video featuring plastic surgery

Little Apple: the hit song all of China is singing to a video featuring plastic surgery

中国掀起“小苹果”热

HAS China found its own Gangnam Style? From Beijing parks to Shanghai skyscrapers and Guangzhou factories to Macau karaoke rooms, people are singing Little Apple - a song apparently so catchy it has even won over the army and police.


Calling themselves the Chopsticks Brothers, Xiao Yang and Wang Taili are neither brothers nor composers, but are responsible for a hit that has become a nationwide phenomenon. 


Xiao Pingguo (Little Apple) was originally intended to promote their latest film when it was released in July, but has proven to be an earworm - the kind of song so insistent it gets stuck in the brain. 

Full Story

The Straits Times | October 20, 2014, Monday


John Daly Goes Golfing with Yao Ming in China

John Daly Goes Golfing with Yao Ming in China

观澜湖世界明星赛,约翰·达利高尔夫球场上遇姚明

PGA golfer John Daly got the chance to play a round at Mission Hills in China with a very special and very tall guest.



Daly tweeted this picture of him with former Houston Rockets center Yao Ming. The 7'6'' Ming towered over Daly, but I wonder if he was able to drive the ball anywhere near as far.

Full Story

Bleacher Report | October 27, 2014, Monday


Designed in China - coming to a store near you?

Designed in China - coming to a store near you?

“中国设计”会来到我们身边吗?

ALL this month, the BBC is looking at the question of whether China can transform itself from the factory of the world into an innovative centre. 


I've been travelling across China to see if it's possible for Made in China to become Designed in China.


Japan made that transformation in 30 years. But there are many more countries that have failed than succeeded.


Innovation, of course, takes on many forms. But, they share one thing in common: talent. 

Full Story

BBC | October 27, 2014, Monday


Does Halloween start early in China? Models in bizarre hats (and even odder make-up) take to the catwalk at Beijing Fashion Week

Does Halloween start early in China? Models in bizarre hats (and even odder make-up) take to the catwalk at Beijing Fashion Week

北京时装周模特装扮奇特吸引眼球

RESPLENDENT in elaborate feathered headdresses, flowing gowns and bizarre bejewelled make-up, it looked as if Halloween had come early as the Mao Geping Make-up Trends Launch show got underway in Beijing.


The biannual China Fashion Week pulls in crowds of fashionistas from across Asia and the Pacific and showcases the work of some of the country's biggest designer names, among them NE TIGER and Wang Yutao.


But this time around, all eyes were on make-up artist Mao Geping, who is famous for his outré take on cosmetics and the dramatic couture-style shows he puts on each time.

Full Story

Daily Mail | October 27, 2014, Monday


Meet Yang Li, a designer putting China on fashion’s biggest stage

Meet Yang Li, a designer putting China on fashion’s biggest stage

新锐设计师李杨带中国时尚走向世界

DESIGNER Yang Li was standing outside his rather sterile showroom on a narrow stone street amid the elegant architecture of the fashion world’s capital, taking a break from the droning task of looking at clothes, selling clothes and talking about clothes to have a cigarette. Li’s shoulder-length black hair, parted down the center, hangs across his back. He wears several small silver hoops in his ears and his black shirt is buttoned to his neck. And he is still. Calm. Tranquil.


The demeanor he presents on a sunny afternoon at the beginning of fall when the fashion world is spinning at a frenetic speed is that of someone unwilling to be rushed or overwhelmed. No matter that every aspect of his chosen industry exudes impatience above all else. Even his voice is a soothing alto, with an accent that is an amalgam of East and West. His inflections are the sum of his experiences — born in China; lived in Perth, Australia; studied in London. Works in Paris.


Who is this guy? Mention his name and most consumers respond: Yang who? Well, he is a comer. He is a fashion designer just beginning his career. His modest company is self-financed; each retailer he wins over registers like a home run. He is a young man with an alluring point of view, unwavering focus and a back story that reflects the ever-rising influence of China in the luxury trade.
China is the world’s leading consumer of luxury goods — its landscape rapidly filling with designer boutiques and primed for growth. But it does not give nearly as much as it gets. Few of China’s designers have moved beyond their local market. Li is part of a new generation of Chinese designers determined to play internationally. And he is aiming at the highest level.

Full Story

The Washington Post | October 26, 2014, Sunday


Alibaba could give Hollywood studios new pipeline into China

Alibaba could give Hollywood studios new pipeline into China

马云到访好莱坞 或携手进中国娱乐市场

HE'S the richest man in China, and he's coming to Hollywood.


Jack Ma, who founded Chinese e-commerce juggernaut Alibaba Group, will be in town next week to visit the lots of major studios, including 20th Century Fox, Sony Pictures Entertainment and Paramount Pictures, for a series of sit-downs with high-level executives.


One likely agenda item is Internet streaming of films and other content. Like Amazon in the U.S., Alibaba is the dominant player in online retailing in China — and could use that clout to give Hollywood a new pipeline into millions of Chinese households.


It's a plan that would appeal to the studios, which must contend with a quota system for theatrical releases in China. Deals with Alibaba could potentially enable the studios to circumvent that restrictive arrangement.

Full Story

New York Times | October 25, 2014, Saturday


China one of top 3 destinations for expats

China one of top 3 destinations for expats

中国成第三大外国人理想居住国

MANY Chinese want to swap Beijing pollution for greener foreign shores, but it seems plenty of expats are happy to head in the opposite direction.


China is the third most desirable expat destination, just behind Singapore in second place and Switzerland in the lead, according to a study by HSBC. 


Lower living costs and bumper salaries play heavily in China's favor. 


"China is the best place for expats looking to make their money go further, with 76% of expats in the country experiencing growth in their spending power once they've moved," the global bank said.

Full Story

CNN | October 23, 2014, Thursday


Embraer admits to being bruised in Chinese private jet market

Embraer admits to being bruised in Chinese private jet market

中国反腐冲击巴西航空公司在华公务机销售

WITH only a few days left until the country’s tightly fought presidential election, Brazilians can talk about little else. However, for Frederico Curado, chief executive of Embraer, the Brazilian aircraft manufacturer, it is the political situation 11,000 miles away in Beijing that is causing concern.


Ever since China’s president Xi Jinping cracked down on opulent spending as part of his anti-graft campaign this year, the world’s fastest-growing business jet market has stalled, says Mr Curado from his offices overlooking S?o Paulo’s banking district.


“It’s been sharp, it’s been sudden,” he says, adding that executives at Chinese state-owned companies as well as government officials have ditched chartered flights for fear of sending the wrong message. “We felt it on our sales, everyone felt it,” he says.


Last week Embraer, which ranks as the world’s third-largest commercial plane manufacturer by revenue, reported an order backlog of $22.1bn – the largest in its history. However, the good news was somewhat marred by disappointing aircraft deliveries in the third quarter, especially of private jets – a segment that accounts for about 20 per cent of revenue.

Full Story

The Financial Times | October 23, 2014, Thursday


China’s Terracotta Warriors Come to Life in Beijing 3-D Production Dennis Law, producer of ‘Terracotta Warriors 3-D Show,’ enlivens the story of Emperor Qin

China’s Terracotta Warriors Come to Life in Beijing 3-D Production Dennis Law, producer of ‘Terracotta Warriors 3-D Show,’ enlivens the story of Emperor Qin

全球首部3D音乐剧《兵马俑》登陆北京--美退休医生复活历史

A retired Denver surgeon is bringing China’s ancient terracotta warriors to life in an offbeat, Broadway-style extravaganza.


“Terracotta Warriors 3-D Show,” which is playing in Beijing through November, is a theatrical production with a high-tech twist, says Dennis Law, who wrote and produced the show.


The musical, performed on stage before a special screen, tells the tale of Emperor Qin Shi Huang, who ruled between 220 and 210 B.C. from the central Chinese city of Xian. Spectators wear 3-D glasses to take in special effects on the screen behind the performers, such as shooting arrows as well as bats that swoop behind singing and dancing concubines and eunuchs.

Full Story

The Wall Street Journal | October 20, 2014, Monday


China: Don't call yourself Dumbledore

China: Don't call yourself Dumbledore

中央电视台提醒:选英文名要三思

CHINESE state media have urged citizens to think carefully when choosing an English name, so that they don't pick one with an unfortunate meaning, it appears.


People are being warned against picking a name that could cause offence, or simply make no sense at all, in advice from the CCTV News website. Many Chinese people prefer to use an English name, particularly if they conduct business with the West. But CCTV says people should avoid fictional characters, names with the potential for sexual innuendo, or random words like Dragon, Fish or Lawyer, which could come back and haunt you "if you want a call back from that serious law firm in America".


An English name should "come with a 'feeling' or idea about what sort of person you are, and where you come from", so names such as Satan or Dumbledore are out, the website says. Women are told to think carefully about "food" names such as Candy, Lolly or Sugar, which might be seen as "stripper names". There's also a lengthy warning about names with sexual connotations, especially when used in conjunction with Dong or Wang, which "are used as slang for male genitalia... so avoid anything like 'Bunny Wang' at all times," the website says.

Full Story

BBC | October 20, 2014, Monday




As China continues to grab increasing media attention worldwide, our partner runs a regular column to reveal what overseas media are saying about China and how they view the country's fast economic, social and cultural development.

中国崛起聚焦了世界的目光。上至高层动态,下至社会民生,中国的一举一动无不成为外媒烹调的材料。我们的合作伙伴观察者网为您带来中文深度阅读。

Check it out at http://www.guancha.cn/WaiMeiKanZhongGuo/




 

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