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Shanghai Daily,上海日报

Global Lens on China

外媒看中国


Tubecrush: The site fuelling China's crush on male commuters snapped on London's Tube

Tubecrush: The site fuelling China's crush on male commuters snapped on London's Tube

中国网民被伦敦“地铁帅哥”迷倒

Scores of men on the London Underground are being celebrated in China for their good looks, but they likely have no idea of their newfound celebrity.


According to BBC Tending, the Chinese micro-blogging site Sina Weibo is a hotbed for pictures of man surreptitiously snapped on the Tube.


The pictures appearing on Sina Weibo, which can gain up to 100,000 likes and shares a piece, have all been pulled from a UK site called Tubecrush.net, and they garner comments such as “I want to take Tubes everyday!”.


Tubecrush co-founder Stephen Motion told the BBC that a third of the site’s entire traffic comes from China.

Full Story

The Independent | March 6, 2015, Friday


How Saturday Night Live in China happened

How Saturday Night Live in China happened

中国版的“周六夜现场”是如何诞生的

If Saturday Night Live provides a window into the American psyche, the Chinese version of the late-night show announced this week might give Western viewers some tantalizing (and hilarious) insights into the modern Chinese mind.


Sohu.com, which runs the country’s third largest video streaming site, said it will produce a Chinese version of the show after licensing the format from SNL creator Lorne Michael’s production company. As part of a deal that took more than a year to sign, Sohu’s producers will travel to New York during a taping week to learn lighting direction, audio, and “figure out how we do it,” says Britta von Schoeler, president of Broadway Video Enterprises, which distributes the show. Sohu also gets the music and even script material from the U.S. show if it wants it. Production is expected to start by the end of this year. “Once they have that information, we let them adapt the format,” says von Schoeler. “They know the Chinese audience much better than we do.

Full Story

Fortune | March 5, 2015, Thursday


Netflix Comes to China, Maybe

Netflix Comes to China, Maybe

NETFLIX可能进入中国

Netflix has plans to establish itself in communist China, without the benefit of a local partner. In fact, the fast-growing movie and TV streaming site feels that a partnership might complicate things.


Netflix’s Chief Content Officer Tom Sardanos says that partnerships can be difficult to manage, which could further hamper the venture’s success. He intends to obtain the multiple licenses need to operate Netflix legally in China on his own. After previously exploring that option, Sarandos believes that this avenue has the potential to work.


Even after obtaining the proper licenses, the subject of content comes up. Although House of Cards and Marco Polo have proved quite popular in China, most other content is censored for violence and adult content. The government wants control over what is seen online. New regulatory rules dictate that a new series be reviewed for content before it is broadcast. This works for both television series and movies that film in one block.

Full Story

Liberty Voice | March 5, 2015, Thursday


China is getting ahead. Can the rest of the world keep up?

China is getting ahead. Can the rest of the world keep up?

中国已经一马当先了,世界其他国家能否跟上步伐?

I’ve visited China over a dozen times in the last decade. And I’ve seen dramatic changes during that time. But nothing compares to what’s happened in the last 18 months. The China of today is a very different place. At the rate changes are occurring, it will be very different another year from now.


The question is: How is the rest of the world going to adapt? Is it going to be able to grow along with China, or will it be left behind? This applies not just to the United States but to any country trying to stay ahead in the 21st century. Here are some considerations.

Full Story

The Washington Post | March 5, 2015, Thursday


How to Top China’s Best-Seller List Without Really Trying

How to Top China’s Best-Seller List Without Really Trying

如何毫不费力地占据中国的畅销书排行榜

Guangzhou, the capital of Guangdong in southern China, 15-year-old leukemia patient He Danting reads The Kite Runner in between chemotherapy sessions. The high school student loves to read and wishes she were back at school, said a March 2 report about He in the local Guangzhou Daily, so nurses gave her Khaled Hosseini’s story of boyhood betrayal and adult redemption set in Afghanistan. Earlier this year, when children at the Bashu Primary School in the megacity of Chongqing were preparing for a monthlong spring festival holiday, parents organized a book lottery. Among the titles given to students for reading over the break was The Kite Runner, reported local news site Hualong Net on March 1. At Tsinghua University in Beijing, popularly known as the “M.I.T. of China,” the third-best-selling book among students in 2014 was also The Kite Runner.


The curious thing is that The Kite Runner is not new to China. It has been in print there since 2006, after being picked up by the Shanghai People’s Press. It’s long been popular, bouncing up and down the top 30 list compiled by OpenBook.com.cn, but recently it became a blockbuster. Over the last nine years, The Kite Runner has sold more than 3 million copies in China. Nearly a third of that total comes from sales in 2014. On Dangdang.com, China’s leading online bookseller, the most popular fiction title over the last 24 hours (as of March 5), the last seven days, the last 30 days, and for all of 2014 was The Kite Runner. The runaway success of the book means Hosseini earned $1.2 million in Chinese royalties in 2014, propelling him to the top of the country’s foreign author rich list, published annually by Huaxi Metropolis Daily, a publication based in the western Chinese city of Chengdu.

Full Story

Foreign Policy | March 5, 2015, Thursday


'Fantastic Art China’ opens in New York, promotes Chinese arts and culture

'Fantastic Art China’ opens in New York, promotes Chinese arts and culture

中国文化大展新年纽约开幕

In line with the celebration of the Chinese New Year, China’s Ministry of Culture launched on Feb. 17 the cultural show “Fantastic Art China” in New York, lauding the country’s arts and tradition.


Organized by the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA), the prime arts institution in China, the event will run until Tuesday next week.


The show will feature a creative bazaar and an art exhibit at the Lincoln Center.


The exhibit features some of the greatest works of six Chinese artists. The signature pieces of these Chinese arts and culture pillars are considered as important art collections in the history of China.


The significant obra maestras of Huang Jiancheng, Lv Shengzhong, Xu Bing and Chen Wenling will be displayed at the David Rubenstein Atrium, while Xu Jian's and Zhan Wang's will be housed at the Avery Fisher Hall.

Full Story

Yibada | February 20, 2015, Friday


Chinese New Year: The year of the ram, or sheep, or goat, or something like that

Chinese New Year: The year of the ram, or sheep, or goat, or something like that

中国农历新年,各种羊傻傻分不清楚

Happy Year of the Ruminant.


Ouch. There’s not much ring to that.


On Feb. 19, more than 1 billion people across Asia will celebrate the new year. In China, the annual migration of 700 million people for this holiday is so huge that it’s been called “the largest annual movement of humans in the world.”


But while there’s broad agreement on what animal other years honor — we just finished with the year of the horse, for example — it’s not clear exactly what creature this new year is the year of. The candidates are ram, sheep or goat, but there’s no consensus on a winner.

Full Story

The Washington Post | February 19, 2015, Thursday


13 ways food is celebrated in Chinese culture

13 ways food is celebrated in Chinese culture

用美食来庆祝新年

As the Chinese New Year celebrations kick off on Feb. 19, 2015, marking the first new moon of the year and continuing for 15 days until the night of the first full moon, families will gather together to celebrate.


During this period, luxurious feasts will allow for many traditions to play out. In Chinese culture, many dishes of the festival also serve as wishes for the upcoming year — they embody the goals and aspirations of the people who consume them. Celebrants eat dumplings, for example, because they desire family harmony, and fish because they want a prosperous harvest.


View the slideshow below for more food traditions followed in Chinese culture during the Lunar New Year.

Full Story

The Huffington Post Canada | February 19, 2015, Thursday


Writer blasts hit film Wolf Totem over 'fake' Mongolian culture

Writer blasts hit film Wolf Totem over 'fake' Mongolian culture

蒙古族作家批判电影“狼图腾”是假蒙古文化的传播

An ethnic Mongolian writer has criticised one of the hit films of the Lunar New Year holiday, claiming the movie distorts the truth and is based on a "fake culture forced on Mongolians".


Wolf Totem, based on a 2004 semi-autobiographical Chinese novel of the same name by Zhang Rong - the pen name of Lu Jiamin - describes the experiences of a young Han student, played by Feng Shaofeng, who is sent to teach in the countryside of Inner Mongolia in 1967, during the Cultural Revolution.


As he spends time with shepherds in the region, Feng starts to learn about the folk traditions, rituals and lives of the Mongolian nomads, as well as their bond with the wolf, a species threatened by officials.


The book also praises the teamwork and competitive spirit of the Mongolians, as well as their freedom, independence and respect for nature.


The film had already generated 248 million yuan (HK$312 million) at the box office by Monday since its release on the mainland on Thursday, news portal Sohu.com reported.


But novelist Guo Xuebo, a member of the China Writers Association, said on his microblog last Wednesday that wolves had never been an emblematic animal for Mongolians.

Full Story

SCMP | February 25, 2015, Wednesday


China builds a cultural empire

China builds a cultural empire

中国打造了一个文化帝国

BEIJING // The Spanish football champions Atletico Madrid are battling Real Madrid and Barcelona to retain their crown, and are also in with a shout in the European Champions League.


A continent away, China’s largest commercial property company, Dalian Wanda, will be keeping a close eye on Atletico’s La Liga and European progress.


Not so much a family business, although it is wholly owned by a father and son team, it is more a multinational one-man band. The firm is involved in everything from shopping mall construction, cinema-building, film distribution and screening, and related business such as advertising.


The company was founded 26 years ago and is still 98 per cent owned by Wang Jianlin, who is also the chief executive. His only son, Wang Sicong, 26, is on the board of Wanda Group, holding the rest of the company.


In 1988, Mr Wang took over a struggling state-owned property company that was 6 million yuan (Dh3.52m) in debt. “The government was freaking out and said whoever can turn it around will get the company for free,” Mr Wang says. “I thought to myself, ‘If I get some bank loans and land, it should be possible’.”


It certainly was.


A former People’s Liberation Army officer who, depending on which Rich List you read, is either China’s richest, second-, or third-richest man, Mr Wang today owns a company that last year had assets of 534.1 billion yuan, which marked a year-on-year growth of 34.5 per cent.


Income reached 242.48bn yuan, up 30 per cent, the ninth year in a row that annual income rose more than 30 per cent.

Full Story

The National Business | February 21, 2015, Saturday




As China continues to grab increasing media attention worldwide, our partner runs a regular column to reveal what overseas media are saying about China and how they view the country's fast economic, social and cultural development.

中国崛起聚焦了世界的目光。上至高层动态,下至社会民生,中国的一举一动无不成为外媒烹调的材料。我们的合作伙伴观察者网为您带来中文深度阅读。

Check it out at http://www.guancha.cn/WaiMeiKanZhongGuo/


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