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Shanghai Daily,上海日报

Global Lens on China

外媒看中国


China's slowdown:From a very big base

China's slowdown:From a very big base

中国经济发展放缓

MUCH of the analysis of China’s 2014 GDP data, which the government published today, has focused on the economy’s slowdown. That is, on one level, understandable. Growth of 7.4% was China’s weakest in 24 years (see chart below). It was also the first time this century that China has missed its official growth target, falling just short of the official goal of 7.5%. But on another level, the focus on the slowdown seems almost myopic. China joined an exclusive club last year: its economic output exceeded $10 trillion, making it only the second country to achieve that feat (America reached this level in 2000). At market exchange rates, China’s economic output was $10.3 trillion last year, more than five-times bigger than a mere decade ago, when it was $1.9 trillion.


Moreover, the increase in China’s economic size means that slower growth now generates as much additional demand as its turbo-charged growth did just a short time ago. Last year’s growth, even with subdued inflation, yielded an extra 4.8 trillion yuan in GDP, almost exactly the same as in 2007, when growth ran to 14.2% and inflation was far higher. And because the economy today includes more labour-intensive services than in the past, China is doing even better at creating new jobs: it added 13.2 million urban jobs last year, compared with 12 million in 2007.

Full Story

The Economists | January 20, 2015, Tuesday


China air quality dire but 'improving'

China air quality dire but 'improving'

中国的空气质量有所好转

THE skies of China's notoriously smog-filled cities saw a marginal improvement last year, according to figures released by Greenpeace Thursday, but pollution remained far above national and international standards.


China's cities are often hit by heavy pollution, blamed on coal-burning by power stations and industry, as well as vehicle use, and it has become a major source of discontent with the ruling Communist Party.


Retired senior officials have acknowledged that it may kill as many as half a million people a year.


Levels of PM2.5 -- airborne particulates with a diameter small enough to deeply penetrate the lungs -- fell year-on-year in 71 of the 74 cities monitored by the ministry of environmental protection, the figures showed.

Full Story

AFP | January 23, 2015, Friday


China link could boost tourism

China link could boost tourism

建立与中国的航线将促进中古旅游

A DIRECT AIR LINK between Cuba and China and a proposed charter service between China and the Bahamas could open the door for Barbados to the burgeoning Chinese tourism business.


China’s Ambassador to Barbados Wang Ke disclosed that Cuba and China had entered into an arrangement that will see Air China flying directly to Cuba and she said she was aware of ongoing negotiations for  charter flights to the Bahamas by Shanghai-based Eastern Airline of China.

Full Story

Nation News | January 23, 2015, Friday


Australia, China clear way for more flights

Australia, China clear way for more flights

澳大利亚与中国开通更多航线

SYDNEY—AUSTRALIA and China further opened up their skies to each other’s airlines, creating new opportunities for carriers from both countries to win business overseas.


The deal, which permits more flights between Australia and China, will allow the likes of Air China Ltd. and Qantas Airways Ltd. raise the number of seats offered between major cities such as Beijing and Sydney by as much as 18%. Further quota increases are to be phased in over the next two years.


The agreement, which follows a free-trade pact the two countries signed last year, helps Australia capture a greater share of the growing business from Chinese tourists. It also satisfies Beijing’s ambition of aggressively expanding the reach of Chinese airlines.

Full Story

The Wall Street Journal | January 23, 2015, Friday


Modernizing China seeks historic preservation model

Modernizing China seeks historic preservation model

中国现代化建设中寻求历史保护

CHINA has been on a demolition spree for the last three decades, rebuilding cities in the name of urbanization and modernization (so modern, in fact, that President Xi Jinping recently called for “an end to ‘weird architecture’”). In the process, countless historic buildings and older communities were bulldozed to make way for the next high-rise.


Throughout the growth, saving historical space was a major topic of discussion, but only rarely did officials and developers call off the wrecking balls. China has outwardly embraced international recommendations from the likes of UNESCO, but the country’s decision-making about cultural heritage preservation has largely been governed by the need to modernize, urbanize and make money. Beijing’s destruction of its own hutong neighborhoods is well documented, and many historical sites have been turned over to tourism operators.


However, urbanization is slowing down in several of the major, more influential cities, allowing scholars and citizens to have slightly more input than before. Where once developers and local officials considered only profit, now community, culture and historical value play larger roles.

Full Story

Next City | January 22, 2015, Thursday


In China, the California name and connection are golden

In China, the California name and connection are golden

在中国,加州元素广受欢迎

Thousands of Beijingers wake up every day in Yosemite. Hordes more have moved to Palm Springs, not to mention Orange County and Silver Lake. They shop at UCLA and go to Hollywood for a bite to eat.


All without leaving the Chinese capital.


When I first moved to China about a year ago, I fretted a tad about missing the Golden State and living in a country where everything had unfamiliar names. Instead, I've found it hard to escape California's good vibrations: There seems to be a little slice of home — or at least some weird or wacky reference to it — almost everywhere you turn.

Full Story

LA Times | January 21, 2015, Wednesday


China says its gender imbalance 'most serious' in the world

China says its gender imbalance 'most serious' in the world

中国称其性别比例失衡的问题世界上“最严重“

CHINESE health authorities on Wednesday described the gender imbalance among newborns as "the most serious and prolonged" in the world, a direct ramification of the country's strict one-child policy.


The statement will add to growing calls for the government to scrap all family planning restrictions in the world's most populous nation, which many scholars say faces a demographic crisis.


Like most Asian nations, China has a traditional bias for sons. Many families abort female fetuses and abandon baby girls to ensure their one child is a son, so about 118 boys are born for every 100 girls, against a global average of 103 to 107.


"Our country has the most serious gender imbalance that is most prolonged and affecting the most number of people," the National Health and Family Planning Commission said in a statement on its website.

Full Story

Yahoo News | January 21, 2015, Wednesday


Eating alone in China

Eating alone in China

在中国单独下馆子的经历

THE first time I ate at a restaurant by myself, I live-tweeted the experience. “Hot-potting alone!” I enthused, posting a photo I’d taken of a burbling electric pot, ringed by plates of enoki mushrooms, plump squares of tofu, and green-bean-infused vermicelli noodles. (If Chinese food fosters communal dining more aggressively than other types of cuisine, then hot pot—think fondue with chicken broth and chili peppers rather than melted cheese—forcefully commands it.) Sitting companionless at a table patently designed for four, I composed the portrait of my meal with some care, both to entice my viewers and to deride my circumstances. “Desperate times call for desperate measures!” I supplied as an additional caption before picking up my chopsticks. Then I hastily put them down again, to link the post to Facebook and Instagram.

Full Story

New Yorker | January 14, 2015, Wednesday


Could China become the OPEC Of solar manufacturing?

Could China become the OPEC Of solar manufacturing?

中国在太阳能领域是否会成为下一个OPEC?

NOT so long ago, solar power was championed as the solution to America’s energy problems because it promised to destroy energy cartels.


More than four decades after enduring the slings and arrows of the Arab oil crisis, most Americans still consider energy independence (or at least reduced dependence) to be an important objective of energy policy.
 

Full Story

Forbes | January 14, 2015, Wednesday


China: The influence of history

China: The influence of history

中国:历史的影响

AS China’s power and influence continue to grow in Asia and beyond, many analysts look to Chinese history to understand how a strong China will behave and view the world in the future. Many of these attempts to apply an historical lens engage in gross simplifications and misreadings of the relevance and meaning of hundreds of years of Chinese thought and behavior. China is often viewed, incorrectly, as if it existed as a monolithic whole over centuries, possessed the same political and security outlook at each stage of its development, and behaved as a modern nation state does today. In particular, some observers blithely assert that China always sought to dominate its world in hard power terms, often succeeded in doing so, and will naturally seek such a position of dominance in the future.

The reality is much more complex and nuanced. In the pre-modern era, Chinese security behavior varied enormously from dynasty to dynasty and between periods of strength and weakness. The variation was so extensive that some China historians believe it is impossible to make any meaningful generalizations about traditional Chinese foreign policy and security behavior, much less apply those lessons to the present and future. Indeed, many historians firmly believe that the emergence of nation states and the rise of nationalism in China in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, as well as the effort to build a strong, prosperous, and modern state and society together offer a far more relevant and reliable context for understanding current and future Chinese security behavior than does the pre-modern era.
 

Full Story

The Diplomat | January 14, 2015, Wednesday




As China continues to grab increasing media attention worldwide, our partner runs a regular column to reveal what overseas media are saying about China and how they view the country's fast economic, social and cultural development.

中国崛起聚焦了世界的目光。上至高层动态,下至社会民生,中国的一举一动无不成为外媒烹调的材料。我们的合作伙伴观察者网为您带来中文深度阅读。

Check it out at http://www.guancha.cn/WaiMeiKanZhongGuo/




 

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